Zarya - Soviet, Russian and International Spaceflight
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International Space Station


Tyneside, UK
2017 Aug 19
Saturday, Day 231

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Expedition 4

This section of the diary covers the period between 2001 December and 2002 June. Yuri Onufrienko, Carl Walz and Dan Bursch continue work aboard the Station and receive Mark Shuttleworth of South Africa.

Date Time (UTC) Event
2001 Dec 3 13:20 Dezhurov and Tyurin begin space walk from Pirs to remove the obstruction to the Progress M1-7 docking - they cut away the offending seal and pull it free
2001 Dec 3 14:54 Docking of Progress M1-7 is completed and the docking interface seals properly
2001 Dec 3 16:06 Dezhurov and Tyurin complete their space walk after 2 hr 46 min
2001 Dec 4 22:40 Endeavour is ready to launch at the T-5 minute hold point pending weather checks
2001 Dec 4 22:44 Launch of Endeavour is postponed for one day - launch is not possible because of weather conditions in the event of a Return-To -Launch-Site abort
2001 Dec 5 22:19 Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-108 into orbit of 225 x 230 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Capt Dominic L Gorie, USN (commander), Lt-Cdr Mark E Kelly, USN (pilot), mission specialists Dr Linda M Godwin and Daniel M Tani - Endeavour also carries the ISS Expedition 4 crew consisting of Col Yuri I Onufrienko, Russian Air Force (station commander), Col Carl E Wal,z USAF and Capt Daniel W Bursch, USN
2001 Dec 6 02:00 Endeavour orbit is 234 x 384 kilometres
2001 Dec 7 20:03 Endeavour docks with the PMA-2 Adaptor at the forward-facing end of Destiny but the vehicles do not latch because of a slight misalignment in the docking units
2001 Dec 7 20:51 Endeavour docking with the ISS is completed - orbit is 370 x 383 kilometres
2001 Dec 7 22:43 Hatches are opened between Endeavour and the ISS - Endeavour cargo include 6,000 US flags for distribution to heroes and families involved in the 2001 Sep 11 attack on the World Trade Center
2001 Dec 8 17:01 Logistics module Rafaello is unberthed from Endeavour cargo bay using the Shuttle remote manipulator system
2001 Dec 8 17:55 Rafaello is docked with the common berthing mechanism on the underside of Destiny
2001 Dec 8 22:11 The crew completes transfer of the Expedition 4 contoured seats into Soyuz TM-33, the Station is then officially 'handed over' to Expedition 4
2001 Dec 9 01:30 The hatch between Destiny and Rafaello is opened and the crew begins transferring equipment
2001 Dec 9 A series of thruster firings by Endeavour over a one hour period raises the ISS orbit - it is now 374 x 385 kilometres
2001 Dec 10 00:43 Hatches between the ISS and Endeavour are sealed in order to allow the shuttle air pressure to be reduced prior to a space walk
2001 Dec 10 17:52 Godwin & Tani start a space walk to install insulation around the top of the ISS truss structure, they also made an attempt to secure one of four legs that brace the starboard station array but were unable to close the latch (open since the array was installed) - they retrieved the errant electrical cover (lost during 2001 Apr 24 during the STS-100 mission ), and positioned two switches to be retrieved and installed during the upcoming STS-110 mission
2001 Dec 10 22:04 Godwin and Tani complete their space walk after 4 hr 12 min
2001 Dec 10 23:55 Hatches between the ISS and Endeavour are re-opened after the space walk
2001 Dec 11 mission mangers inform the crew of Endeavour that their mission has been extended by one day from Dec 14 in order to assist with additional maintenance tasks on the station, including work on a treadmill and air compressor in Zvezda
2001 Dec 11 A second series of thruster firings by Endeavour raises the ISS orbit - it is now 378 x 386 kilometres
2001 Dec 12 A third series of thruster firings by Endeavour raises the ISS orbit - it is now 388 x 390 kilometres
2001 Dec 14 22:44 Rafaello is re-berthed in Endeavour cargo bay
2001 Dec 15 13:16 Hatches between the ISS and Endeavour are closed prior to the shuttle departure
2001 Dec 15 14:55 A 20 minute firing sequence using Endeavour thrusters raises the ISS orbit by 1 kilometre and ensures that a thirty year old spent Russian rocket increases its predicted miss distance from 5 kilometres to 40 kilometres
2001 Dec 15 17:28 Endeavour undocks from the ISS and begins a fly-round - Endeavour then fires its thrusters and moves away
2001 Dec 16 15:00 Endeavour deploys a 'Getaway Special' satellite STARSHINE 2 from its cargo bay
2001 Dec 17 16:50 Endeavour fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2001 Dec 17 17:55 Endeavour lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
2001 Dec 17 17:56 Wheel stop - Endeavour mission is over and the ISS crew exchange between Expedition 3 and Expedition 4 has been completed
2002 Jan 8 19:45 Approximate time - Progress M1-7's rocket engines are tested briefly prior to an orbit re-boost planned for the following day - orbit is 378 x 381 kilometres
2002 Jan 10 01:35 mission Control, Moscow fire Progress M1-7's rocket engines in the first stage of a two-part re-boost of the International Space Station orbit
2002 Jan 10 03:43 mission Control, Moscow fire Progress M1-7's rocket engines in the second stage of a two-part re-boost of the International Space Station orbit - it is now 392 x 401 kilometres, nearly two kilometres lower than expected - when calculating parameters of the burn, Russian engineers did not allow sufficiently for the pressure drop in the 30 metre long internal fuel line from Zvezda to Progress
2002 Jan 14 20:59 Using the Pirs module airlock, Onufrienko and Walz start a space walk to install the Strela-2 crane on the outside of Pirs, and to mount an amateur radio antenna on the outside of Zvezda
2002 Jan 15 03:02 Onufrienk and Walz complete their space walk after 6 hr 12 min
2002 Jan 25 15:19 Using the Pirs module airlock, Onufrienko and Walz start a space walk to retrieve equipment left outside for long-duration space exposure studies, complete the mounting of an amateur radio antenna on the outside of Zvezda, and to install shields on Zvezda's thrusters to reduce gas contamination of the station's surface
2002 Jan 25 21:18 Onufrienk and Walz complete their space walk after 5 hr 59 min, taking 15 minutes longer than anticipated
2002 Jan 26 International Space Station passes close to a piece of debris from an exploded Pegasus rocket stage (launched the STEP-2 satellite in 1994) - it is not considered a serious threat
2002 Jan 29 21:02 International Space Station passes 14.8 kilometres from a piece of debris from a Scout rocket (launched a pair of store-forward comsats in 1990) - it is not considered a serious threat
2002 Jan 30 07:41 International Space Station again passes close to the piece of debris from an exploded Pegasus rocket stage (launched the STEP-2 satellite in 1994) - again it is not considered a serious threat
2002 Feb 1 The crew remove the electronics pack from the Progress M1-7 Kurs rendezvous system - it will be stored and later returned to Earth for re-use
2002 Feb 4 A software problem causes Zvezda's computers to have to be re-booted - the Station goes into free drift while this is happening
2002 Feb 20 11:38 Half an hour earlier than planned, Walz and Bursch begin a space walk from the Quest airlock (the first time it has been used without a Shuttle Orbiter attached to the station) - they connected cables on the outside of the station and retrieved tools from a previous work area as well as removing various covers from external apparatus
2002 Feb 20 14:05 Walz and Bursch stop work momentarily to mark the 40th anniversary of John Glenn's first US orbital space mission
2002 Feb 20 16:25 Walz and Bursch complete their space walk after 4 hr 47 min - they were originally planned to be outside for 5½ hours
2002 Feb 21 By way of testing Progress M1-7's thrusters, International Space Station orbit is raised from 378 x 385 kilometres to 378 x 393 kilometres
2002 Feb 21 The International Space Station crew retreats into the Russian segment of the station due to an odour in the US segment, emanating from Quest - the PMA-1 hatch is partially closed
2002 Feb 22 The crew re-opens the US station segment after the atmosphere has been purged - the odour is put down to a contaminated carbon dioxide scrubber releasing gases when it was being re-charged
2002 Feb 27 Computers in the US segment of the station suffer a temporary breakdown
2002 Mar 1 Approximate time - the International Space Station crew photographs the vapour trail left by Shuttle Columbia as it sets off on the STS-109 Hubble Telescope repair mission
2002 Mar 1 The crew begins preparing the Kolibri micro-satellite for launch from Progress M1-7 when it departs
2002 Mar 3 03:02 Planned time for an avoidance manoeuvre to take the International Space Station away from an item of orbiting space debris - it does not take place as the miss-distance is deemed to be safe
2002 Mar 8 During a test with the station's remote manipulator arm, it is confirmed that one of it's 'wrist' joints has failed
2002 Mar 9 13:30 International Space Station and Shuttle Columbia, on its HST Repair mission, exchange messages by direct radio link
2002 Mar 13 00:06 International Space Station orbit is raised using the engines of Progress M1-7 - the purpose is two-fold - as well as raising the orbit, it puts the International Space Station in the right position for the upcoming Progress M1-8 launch
2002 Mar 13 00:52 A second firing of Progress M1-7's engine completes the orbit re-bost - orbit is now 392 x 397 kilometres
2002 Mar 19 Progress M1-8 and its launching rocket are rolled out to the launch pad at Baikonur Cosmodrome
2002 Mar 19 17:43 Progress M1-7 undocks from the International Space Station
2002 Mar 19 17:46 Progress M1-7 fires its thrusters to begin moving away from the International Space Station
2002 Mar 19 21:40 A second firing of Progress M1-7's engines speeds up the rate of separation
2002 Mar 19 22:28 Kolibri', a small Russian/Australian satellite is released, using springs, from Progress M1-7 into an orbit of x kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination - it is intended for use in comparative studies of near-Earth space over Europe and Australia, as well as for investigation of processes in Earth's radiation belts and Earth's magnetosphere during solar flares
2002 Mar 20 01:27 Progress M1-7 fires its onboard engine and re-enters the Earth's atmosphere to burn up over the Pacific Ocean
2002 Mar 21 20:13 Progress M1-8 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Soyuz-U rocket into an orbit of 189 x 233 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination - it carries 2.4 tonnes of supplies, including propellant for replenishing Zvezda's tanks and will take one day loner than usual to reach the International Space Station - this is due to tests being carried out accelerometers for the new Soyuz TMA vehicle - first launch due 2002 October
2002 Mar 22 05:10 Progress M1-8 orbit is 284 x 313 kilometers
2002 Mar 22 Onufrienko and Walz are given a course of instruction by mission Control-Moscow in operating the TORU remote control system for use with Progress
2002 Mar 24 20:57 Under the control of mission Control Centre - Moscow, Progress M1-8 docks with the rear-facing port of Zvezda, recently cleared by the departure of Progress M-45 - the docking does not produce a seal between the two spacecraft - International Space Station orbit is 389 x 394 kilometres
2002 Mar 25 00:00 The hatch between Progress M1-8 and the International Space Station is opened for the first time
2002 Mar 27 11:55 International Space Station passes within 3 kilometres of a piece of debris from the 2002 launch of India's PSLV rocket - avoiding action is not necessary
2002 Mar 27 13:15 Russian mission controllers begin a series of tests that finish with test firings of Progress M1-8's attitude control thrusters
2002 Apr 8 18:44 After a brief hold in the final moments of countdown, the crew of thge International Space Station observes Space Shuttle Atlantis being launched from Launch Complex  39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-110 into orbit of  155 x 230 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination, with a crew consisting of Lt-Col Michael Bloomfield USAF (commander) Cdr Stephen Frick USN (pilot), and mission Specialists Lt-Col Rex Walheim USAF, Ellen Ochoa, Lee Morin, Jerry Ross and Stephen Smith After a brief hold in the final moments of countdown, the crew of thge International Space Station observes Space Shuttle Atlantis being launched from Launch Complex  39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-110 into orbit of  155 x 230 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination, with a crew consisting of Lt-Col Michael Bloomfield USAF (commander) Cdr Stephen Frick USN (pilot), and mission Specialists Lt-Col Rex Walheim USAF, Ellen Ochoa, Lee Morin, Jerry Ross and Stephen Smith After a brief hold in the final moments of countdown, the crew of thge International Space Station observes Space Shuttle Atlantis being launched from Launch Complex  39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-110 into orbit of  155 x 230 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination, with a crew consisting of Lt-Col Michael Bloomfield USAF (commander) Cdr Stephen Frick USN (pilot), and mission Specialists Lt-Col Rex Walheim USAF, Ellen Ochoa, Lee Morin, Jerry Ross and Stephen Smith After a brief hold in the final moments of countdown, the crew of thge International Space Station observes Space Shuttle Atlantis being launched from Launch Complex  39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-110 into orbit of  155 x 230 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination, with a crew consisting of Lt-Col Michael Bloomfield USAF (commander) Cdr Stephen Frick USN (pilot), and mission Specialists Lt-Col Rex Walheim USAF, Ellen Ochoa, Lee Morin, Jerry Ross and Stephen Smith
2002 Apr 9 Unufrienko and Bursch remove the electronics pack from the Soyuz TM-33 Kurs rendezvous system - it will be stored and later returned to Earth for re-use
2002 Apr 11 10:45 Ochoa uses the International Space Station Remote Manipulator System to unberth the S-0 Truss from Atlantis's cargo bay
2002 Apr 11 14:30 The S-0 Truss is berthed in its cradle on the International Space Station
2002 Apr 11 14:35 Smith and Walheim begin a space walk to install struts for the S-0 Truss, install electronic equipment and connect cables, and to inspect an area of thermal insulation around the Station's GPS antenna (they confirm that part of the insulation is blocking one of the antennae
2002 Apr 11 22:24 Smith and Walheim complete their space walk after 7 hr 48 min, having taken about one hour longer than planned and having to postpone some of their work
2002 Apr 12 Cosmonautics Day in Russia - celebrating 41 years since Gagarin's flight, also the 21st anniversary of Columbia's launch on the first space shuttle mission
2002 Apr 13 14:09 Ross and Morin begin a space walk to add further struts to support the S-0 Truss, and connect more cables
2002 Apr 13 21:39 Ross and Morin complete their space walk after 7 hr 30 min
2002 Apr 13 22:39 A series of firings by Atlantis's Reaction Control System over a one hour period raises the International Space Station orbit slightly - it is now 385 x 389 kilometres kilometres
2002 Apr 14 13:48 Smith and Walheim begin a space walk to release the temporary clamp holding the S-0 Truss in place until the struts were installed, to remove clamps holding Truss cables in place during the launch, and to fit additional handrails to the outside of the station
2002 Apr 14 20:15 Smith and Walheim complete their space walk after 6 hr 27 min
2002 Apr 14 21:52 A second series of firings by Atlantis's Reaction Control System over a one hour period raises the International Space Station orbit slightly - it is now 385 x 391 kilometres kilometres
2002 Apr 15 12:22 Walz starts a seven minute test of the mobile section of the S-0 Truss, running it along it tracks - the test is not completed
2002 Apr 15 21:40 Walz completes the test of the S-0 Truss 'railcar'
2002 Apr 16 14:29 Ross and Morin begin a space walk to add a connecting handrail between the S-0 Truss and the Quest airlock, to continue connecting cables and releasing safety clamps, to install floodlights on the outside of the station, and to adjust the position of a thermal blanket that is blocking one of the GPS antennae
2002 Apr 16 21:06 Ross and Morin complete their space walk after 6 hr 37 min
2002 Apr 17 12:20 A third series of firings by Atlantis's thrusters over a one hour period raises the International Space Station orbit to 388 x 400 kilometres
2002 Apr 17 16:00 Approximate time - hatches between the International Space Station and Atlantis are closed
2002 Apr 17 18:30 Atlantis undocks from the International Space Station and begins a fly-round - Atlantis then fires its thrusters and moves away
2002 Apr 18 09:53 A six minute test is conducted on the Soyuz TM-33 thrusters prior to it being re-positioned on April 20
2002 Apr 19 15:20 Atlantis fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2002 Apr 20 03:15 Soyuz TM-33's sytems are activated prior to it being re-positioned, and the crew begins to de-activate the Station
2002 Apr 20 05:00 Hatches between the International Space Station and Soyuz TM-33 are closed
2002 Apr 20 09:16 Soyuz TM-33 undocks from Zvezda and moves along the hull of the station
2002 Apr 20 09:37 Soyuz TM-33 re-docks at the Station's Pirs module
2002 Apr 20 11:30 The International Space Station crew re-enters the station from Soyuz TM-33
2002 Apr 23 01:00 Soyuz TM-34 and its launching rocket are rolled out to the launch pad at Baikonur Cosmodrome
2002 Apr 25 06:26 Soyuz TM-34 spacecraft launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome by Soyuz rocket into an orbit at approximately 185 x 210 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination, carrying a Soyuz "Taxi" crew consisting of Yuri Gidzenko (commander), Roberto Vittori of Italy and working for ESA (Flight Engineer no 1), and Mark Shuttleworth - a private citizen of South Africa
2002 Apr 25 10:10 Soyuz TM-34 completes its first orbital correction
2002 Apr 25 11:00 Soyuz TM-34 completes its second orbital correction - orbit is now 242 x 270 kilometres
2002 Apr 26 07:22 Soyuz TM-34 completes its third orbital correction - orbit is lowered slightly to 244 x 266 kilometres
2002 Apr 27 07:55 Soyuz TM-34 docks with the downward facing port of Zarya - International Space Station orbit is 388 x 398 kilometres
2002 Apr 27 The crew seats are switched between Soyuz TM-34 and Soyuz TM-33
2002 Apr 28 Shuttlewoth takes a telephone call from President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa
2002 May 2 mission control - Moscow conducts a firing test of Soyuz TM-33's thrusters
2002 May 4 20:15 The Taxi crew re-activates Soyuz TM-34 prior to departure
2002 May 4 21:15 Hatches between Pirs and Soyuz TM-34 are closed
2002 May 5 00:31 Soyuz TM-33 undocks from the Pirs module carrying the Taxi crew of Gidzenko, Vittori and Shuttleworth
2002 May 5 03:52 Soyuz TM-32 lands 26 kilometres south-east of Arkalyk in Kazakhstan
2002 May 15 mission managers determine that the International Space Station is to pass 3.3 kilometres from the spent rocket stage from the Cosmos 2292 launch
2002 May 15 22:30 The thrusters of Progress M1-8 are used to raise the Station's orbit slightly in order to increase the miss distance from the Cosmos 2292 rocket stage
2002 May 20 18:21 The Station passes near a spent Indian-launched rocket stage - no avoidance manoeuvre is necessary
2002 May 22 The thrusters of Progress M1-8 are fired to make a minor orbital correction - orbit is 384 x 395 kilometres
2002 May 26 19:48 The International Space Station passes 4.6 kilometres from the spent rocket stage from the Cosmos 185 launch
2002 May 30 Onufrienko conducts voice and telemetry tests with the tracking ship 'Cosmonaut Viktor Patsayev' which is tied up in the harbour of Kaliningrad on the Baltic Sea
2002 May 30 23:44 Planned launch time for Endeavour on the STS-111 mission - the launch is delayed
2002 Jun 4 14:27 A problem with a liquid hydrogen vent pipe on the launch support structure causes NASA to delay the day's planned launch of Endeavour until April 8
2002 Jun 5 21:22 After several delays due to weather, Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-111 into orbit of 155 x 235 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Kenneth Cockrell (commander), Lt-Col Paul S Lockhart USAF (pilot), mission specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz PhD and Col Phillipe Perrin of the French Air Force (CNES) - Endeavour also carries the International Space Station Expedition 5 crew consisting of Col Valeriy G Korzun of the Russian Air Force (station commander), Peggy Whitson PhD and Sergei Y Treschev
2002 Jun 6 03:00 Endeavour's orbit is 233 x 333 kilometres
2002 Jun 7 16:25 Endeavour docks with the PMA-2 Adaptor at the forward-facing end of Destiny - orbit is 381 x 389 kilometres
2002 Jun 7 19:08 The hatches between Endeavour and the International Space Station are opened
2002 Jun 7 22:55 The Expedition 5 crew formally takes command of the International Space Station
2002 Jun 8 11:00 Approximate time - the bearing in a Control Moment Gyro on the Z-1 truss fails
2002 Jun 8 13:29 Endeavour's commander Ken Cockrell attaches the Shuttle's remote manipulator arm to the logistics module Leonardo
2002 Jun 8 13:45 Logistics module Leonardo is unberthed from Endeavour's cargo bay
2002 Jun 8 14:28 Leonardo is attached to the Common Berthing Mechanism on the underside of Destiny
2002 Jun 9 15:27 Chang-Diaz and Perrin begin a space walk to attach equipment to the outside of the Station, examine the thermal covering over the failed gyro, and to remove unnecessary thermal blanket from another are on the outside of the station
2002 Jun 9 22:41 Chang-Diaz and Perrin complete their space walk after 7 hr 14 min
2002 Jun 10 09:03 Whitson and Walz use the Station's remote manipulator system to attach the Base Unit on the S0 truss's Mobile Transporter
2002 Jun 10 20:53 A series of thruster firings by Endeavour over a one hour period raises the International Space Station orbit - it is now 382 x 391 kilometres
2002 Jun 11 15:20 Chang-Diaz and Perrin begin a second space walk to attach video, data and power cables to the Mobile Base Unit, use a torque wrench to complete the Unit's installation and to re-locate an external TV camera
2002 Jun 12 00:19 Walz and Bursch pass the previous US long duration mission record of 184 days 4 hrs set by Shannon Lucid aboard Mir
2002 Jun 12 00:19 Walz and Bursch pass the previous US long duration mission record of 184 days 4 hrs set by Shannon Lucid aboard Mir
2002 Jun 12 13:08 A second, one hour, series of thruster firings by Endeavour raises the International Space Station orbit - it is now 384 x 392 kilometres
2002 Jun 13 15:16 After a thirty minute delay, Chang-Diaz and Perrin begin a third space walk to replace a joint on the Station's remote manipulator arm
2002 Jun 13 22:33 Chang-Diaz and Perrin complete their space walk after 7 hr 17 min
2002 Jun 14 A third series of thruster firings by Endeavour raises the International Space Station orbit - it is now 390 x 399 kilometres
2002 Jun 14 14:30 Hatches between Destiny and Leonardo are closed
2002 Jun 14 18:11 Leonardo is re-berthed in Endeavour's cargo bay
2002 Jun 15 12:23 Hatches between the International Space Station and Endeavour are closed
2002 Jun 15 14:32 Endeavour undocks from the International Space Station and begins a fly-round
2002 Jun 15 16:53 Endeavour fires its thrusters and moves away from the International Space Station
2002 Jun 17 Two possible landing opportunities for Endeavour at the Kennedy Space Center are waved off because of rain and thunderstorms
2002 Jun 18 Two further landing opportunities for Endeavour at the Kennedy Space Center are waved off because of rain and thunderstorms
2002 Jun 18 Landing opprtunities for Endeavour at the Kennedy Space Center are again waved off because of rain and thunderstorms
2002 Jun 18 16:50 Endeavour fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2002 Jun 18 17:26 Endeavour lands on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base
2002 Jun 18 17:27 Wheel stop - Endeavour's mission is over and the International Space Station crew exchange between Expedition 4 and Expedition 5 has been completed
2002 Jun 22 10:00 Korzun and Treschev undertake thirty minutes of "refresher" training on the use of Zvezda's TORU remote control system in case it has to be used for the upcoming Progress M-46 docking (problems have been experienced with spurious signals being received by the automatic 'Jurs' system during recent automatic dockings)
2002 Jun 24 Progress M-46 and its launching rocket are rolled out to the launch pad at Baikonur Cosmodrome
2002 Jun 24 06:30 Approximate time - Progress M1-8 is re-activated and preparations begin for its departure from the International Space Station
2002 Jun 25 08:26 Progress M1-8 undocks from the International Space Station - the event is ninety minutes later than planned due to a minor problem with the vehicle
2002 Jun 25 11:35 Progress M1-8 fires its onboard engine and begins to descend
2002 Jun 25 12:13 Progress M1-8 re-enters the Earth's atmosphere to burn up over the Pacific Ocean
2002 Jun 26 05:36 Progress M-46 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Soyuz-U rocket into an orbit of approximately 183 x 215 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination - it carries 2.58 tonnes of supplies, including propellant for replenishing Zvezda's tanks
2002 Jun 26 16:00 Progress M-46 orbit is 267 x 277 kilometres
2002 Jun 28 07:20 Korzun and Treschev conduct a two hour test of the Kurs system using Progress M-46 which is trailing the Station by 30 kilometres - both vehicles are in an orbit of 387 x 397 kilometres
2002 Jun 28 09:55 Progress M-46 fires its thrusters to adjust its orbit in order to move it further away from the International Space Station - it is now 389 x 399 kilometres
2002 Jun 29 06:23 Under the control of mission Control Centre - Moscow, and after a fly-round of the International Space Station to test the radio reception by the 'Kurs' automated rendezvous system, Progress M-46 docks with the rear-facing port of Zvezda - International Space Station orbit is 387 x 397 kilometres
2002 Jun 29 09:30 Approximate time - hatches between Progress M-46 and Zvezda are opened
Copyright © Robert Christy, all rights reserved
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