Zarya - Soviet, Russian and International Spaceflight
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International Space Station


Scarborough, UK
2014 Apr 24
Thursday, Day 114

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Zarya and Unity

This section of the ISS diary covers 1998 October and 2000 May. It includes the first elements going into space and the work done by space shuttle crews in preparing the station for habitation.

Date Time (UTC) Event
1998 Oct 21 Space Shuttle Endeavour rolled-out to Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
1998 Oct 26 Unity module arrives at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
1998 Nov 13 Unity module placed inside Shuttle Endeavour cargo bay
1998 Nov 18 Proton rocket carrying the Zarya space station module moved to Launch Complex 81 at the Baikonur cosmodrome
1998 Nov 20 06:40 Zarya launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 81 by Proton rocket into 176 x 343 kilometre orbit at 51.6 degrees inclination
1998 Nov 25 Zarya established in orbit of 383 x 396 kilometres, awaiting arrival of Space Shuttle 'Endeavour '
1998 Dec 3 08:59 Originally-planned launch time for Space Shuttle Endeavour to rendezvous with Zarya - a delay in the countdown due to an erroneous alarm resulted in the launch window closing before Endeavour could lift off
1998 Dec 4 08:35 Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-88. Crew consists of US Marine Col Robert Cabana (commander), US Marine Major Frederick Sturckow (pilot), and mission specialists - US Marine Lt-Col Nancy J. Currie, USAF Col Jerry Ross, James Newman and cosmonaut Sergei Krikalyov
1998 Dec 5 22:06 mission specialist Currie uses Endeavour remote manipulator system to raise Unity from Endeavour cargo bay
1998 Dec 5 23:45 Unity is attached vertically to a docking adaptor in Endeavour cargo bay
1998 Dec 6 23:47 Following rendezvous, mission specialist Currie controls Endeavour remote manipulator arm to capture Zarya
1998 Dec 7 02:07 The Endeavour /Unity combination completes the docking with Zarya . Orbit is 386 x 401 kilometres
1998 Dec 7 22:10 Ross and Newman open Endeavour hatch to start a space walk to connect external communications and electrical power cables between Zarya and Unity , and to install handholds and connectors to the outside of Unity for use on later space walks
1998 Dec 8 03:49 Zarya begins to supply electrical power to Unity - some of Unity systems are powered up
1998 Dec 8 05:31 Ross and Newman seal Endeavour hatch at the end of the space walk
1998 Dec 9 20:30 Ross and Newman open Endeavour hatch to start a space walk to attach communications antennae to Unity for use with the Data Relay Tracking System; to install insulation blankets and a sunshade on Unity (they let go of one blanket which drifted away from the ISS ); and to use a pole to complete the deployment of a rendezvous radar antenna on Zarya which had stuck in a partially-erected position
1998 Dec 10 03:35 Ross and Newman seal Endeavour hatch at the end of the space walk
1998 Dec 10 19:54 Krikalyov and Cabana become the first people to enter the ISS - the Endeavour crew check some ISS systems, install portable fans and lights, and carry equipment aboard from Endeavour
1998 Dec 10 21:12 The hatch between Unity and Zarya is opened for the first time
1998 Dec 11 22:41 The hatch between Unity and Zarya is closed
1998 Dec 12 00:26 Work is completed and the crew closes the hatch between Endeavour and Unity
1998 Dec 12 20:33 Ross and Newman open Endeavour hatch to start a space walk to install a toolkit on the outside of Unity for use by future astronauts; to disconnect cables on Unity to ensure it cannot be undocked; to install a hand hold on Zarya and complete the deployment of a second antenna which has also stuck; and to test an astronaut manoeuvring unit
1998 Dec 13 03:32 Ross and Newman seal Endeavour hatch at the end of the space walk
1998 Dec 13 20:25 Endeavour undocks from the International Space Station and begins a fly-around of the station
1998 Dec 13 21:39 Endeavour fires its thrusters and starts to move away from the ISS - joint operations are completed
1998 Dec 14 04:30 Argentinian SAC-A technology test satellite is ejected from Endeavour cargo bay
1998 Dec 15 02:09 MightySat technology demonstration satellite is ejected from Endeavour cargo bay
1998 Dec 15 02:23 mission Control gives Endeavour a 'Go' to fire its OMS engines for re-entry
1998 Dec 16 02:47 Endeavour fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
1998 Dec 16 03:53 Endeavour lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
1998 Dec 16 03:54 Wheel stop - Endeavour mission is completed
1998 Dec 16 A test firing of Zarya thusters raises its orbit from 387 x 399 kilometres to 394 x 400 kilometres
1998 Dec 21 Two firings of Zarya thrusters raises its orbit further to 397 x 403 kilometres
1999 Apr 24 Space Shuttle Discovery rolled-out to Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
1999 May 16 Space Shuttle Discovery rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building for repairs to insulation on the External Tank necessitated by exposure to hailstorms
1999 May 20 Space Shuttle Discovery returned to Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
1999 May 27 10:49 Space Shuttle Discovery launched from Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-96. Crew consists of Commander Kent V Rominger, USN (commander), Lt-Col Rick D Husband, USAF (pilot), and mission specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette (Canada), and Colonel Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Russian Air Force.
1999 May 29 04:24 Discovery becomes the first spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station as it links up with the PMA-2 docking adaptor on the Unity Module - orbit is 379 x 385 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
1999 May 30 02:56 Jernigan and Barry open Discovery hatch to start a space walk to inspect paintwork on the outside of the two modules, to add thermal insulation to Unity , and to transfer equipment, including two cranes (the US Orbital Transfer Device, and the the Russian trela'), for use on future mission s, to the exterior of the Zarya module - the cranes and some sets of tools are secured to the outside of the station ready for assembly by a later crew
1999 May 30 10:51 Jernigan and Barry seal Discovery hatch at the end of the space walk - one hour and 25 minutes later than planned due to difficulties with retaining bolts when removing equipment from Discovery cargo bay
1999 May 31 01:14 The hatch into Unity is opened and the crew begins transferring two tonnes of equipment and supplies from Discovery Spacehab module aboard the International Space Station, including clothing, water, sleeping bags and spare parts - work includes fitting noise suppression equipment to Zarya air-circulation fans which have proved to be noisier than anticipated, repairing a radio system onboard Unity , and replacing battery chargers onboard Zarya
1999 Jun 2 Work is completed onboard the ISS
1999 Jun 3 09:44 The crew closes the hatch between Discovery and Unity
1999 Jun 3 10:33 Approx time - operation using Discovery Reaction Control System to boost the orbit of ISS is started
1999 Jun 3 11:10 Approx time - orbit boost for the ISS is completed - orbit is now 385 x 399 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
1999 Jun 3 22:39 Discovery undocks from the International Space Station
1999 Jun 3 22:57 Discovery begins a fly-around of the station
1999 Jun 4 00:53 Discovery fires its RCS engines and moves away from the International Space Station
1999 Jun 5 07:21 STARSHINE (Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment ) satellite is ejected from Discovery cargo bay - it is a 0.5 metre diameter, hollow sphere covered with over 800 polished aluminum Mirrors to permit its easy visibility from the ground for use by students in measuring upper atmosphere air density and calculating the orbit
1999 Jun 6 04:36 mission Control gives Discovery a 'Go' to fire its OMS engines for re-entry
1999 Jun 6 04:54 Discovery fires its OMS engines for three and a half minutes to initiate re-entry
1999 Jun 6 06:02 Discovery lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
1999 Jun 6 06:03 Wheel stop - Discovery mission is completed
1999 Jun 13 The International Space Station passes seven kilometres from a Russian-launched rocket stage - mission controllers had originally calculated a miss distance of one kilometre, and attempted to fire Zarya thrusters to change the station orbit slightly, but in the event, Zarya computer had rejected the command as dangerous because the data it received would have resulted in a thruster firing for longer than permitted by safety rules
1999 Jul 8 Russian Spaceflight Control Centre suffers five hour power cut due to severe hail storms affecting the local power supply and the backup generator system
1999 Jul 15 Russian Spaceflight Control Centre suffers a second, one hour power cut due to maintenence work following the incident on 1999 July 8 - this time the standby power system operates successfully
1999 Oct 26 14:03 Zarya thrusters fired for five seconds to raise the International Space Station orbit by 1.5 kilometres because of a calculation showing that it would pass 1.4 kilometres from a Pegasus launch vehicle on 27 October
1999 Oct 27 08:00 Approximate time - the International Space Station passes 139 kilometres from a Pegasus rocket stage, orbit is 366 x 382 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
1999 Dec 1 22:57 Zarya thrusters are fired for 27 seconds in the first part of a manouevre to raise the orbit - prior to the firing the orbit is 358 x 372 kilometeres
1999 Dec 1 23:43 A second firing of Zarya thrusters completes the orbital manouevre - orbit is now 377 x 388 kilometres
2000 Jan 18 06:56 Originally planned launch time for Progress M1-5, a fuel tanker to be used to de-orbit Mir - the launch is delayed because of the Mir power problem
2000 Mar 25 Space Shuttle Atlantis rolled-out to Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Apr 24 20:15 Originally-planned launch time for Shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station - lift off postponed during the standard T-9 minute hold due to high winds at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility
2000 Apr 25 19:52 Originally-planned second launch attempt for Shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station - lift off postponed T-40 minutes due to hugh winds at the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility
2000 Apr 26 19:27 Originally-planned third launch attempt for Shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station - lift off postponed due to weather conditions at the trans-Atlantic abort landing sites in Spain and Morocco
2000 May 16 NASA agrees to postpone a launch attempt of Shuttle Atlantis to the ISS planned for 10:38 on 18 May because of a delayed launch attempt of an Atlas III rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
2000 May 19 10:11 Space Shuttle Atlantis launched from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-101. Crew consists of Commander Col James D Halsell, USAF (commander), Col Scott J Horowit,z USAF (pilot), and mission specialists Col Susan J Helms, USAF, Yuri Usachev (Russia), retired Col James S Voss, USA, Mary Ellen Weber, Lt-Col Jeffrey Williams, USA
2000 May 21 04:31 Atlantis docks with the PMA-2 docking adaptor on the Unity Module of the International Space Station while passing over the Ukraine and within range of Russian tracking stations - orbit is 332 x 341 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 May 22 01:48 Voss and Williams open Atlantis hatch to start a space walk to secure the US Orbital Transfer Device (OTD) crane to be used to transfer astronauts around the outside of the ISS - it had become loose from its mounting on Unity following initial installation by astronauts Jernigan and Barry during Discovery STS-96 mission one year previously. They complete assembly of the Russian trela' crane (similar to one on Mir) on the outside of Zarya by adding a further section, install further handholds on the outside of the station, replace a faulty radio antenna on Unity and take photographs of the station exterior surface
2000 May 22 08:32 Voss and Williams seal Atlantis hatch at the end of the space walk.
2000 May 23 00:03 The hatch into Unity is opened and the crew of Atlantis begins work inside the station to replace four of the six batteries in the Zarya module, install additional fans and ducting for air circulation, and to unload supplies from Atlantis Spacehab module
2000 May 24 00:02 Atlantis begins an approximately one hour programme of firing its Reaction Control System (RCS) to raise the orbit of the ISS - 27 firings of 130 seconds duration each
2000 May 25 01:16 Atlantis begins a second one hour programme of firing its Reaction Control System (RCS) to raise the orbit of the ISS , using a similar firing pattern to the first session
2000 May 25 23:36 Atlantis begins a third one hour programme of firing its Reaction Control System (RCS) to raise the orbit of the ISS , using a similar firing pattern to the earlier sessions - orbit is now 372 x 380 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 May 26 08:08 The crew closes the hatch between Atlantis and Unity
2000 May 26 23:03 Atlantis undocks from the International Space Station and begins a fly-around to photograph and inspect the exterior of the ISS
2000 May 26 23:44 Atlantis fires its RCS and moves away from the ISS
2000 May 29 05:12 Atlantis fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2000 May 29 06:20 Atlantis lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
2000 May 29 06:21 Wheel stop - Atlantis mission is completed
2000 Jul 8 Proton rocket carrying the Zvezda space station module moved Launch Complex 23 at the Baikonur cosmodrome
2000 Jul 12 04:56 Zvezda launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 23 by Proton rocket into 179 x 332 kilometre orbit at 51.6 degrees inclination - ISS orbit is 363 x 370 kilometers
2000 Jul 14 Zvezda orbit raised to 288 x 357 kilometers
2000 Jul 18 ISS orbit raised to 367 x 373 kilometres
2000 Jul 26 00:45 Zvezda docks with the aft port of the ISS Zarya module - orbit is 364 x 371 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination - the ISS now consists of three modules, Zvezda , Zarya and Unity
2000 Aug 6 18:26 Progress M1-3 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 1 by Soyuz-U rocket
2000 Aug 6 18:35 Progress M1-3 separates from its rocket and enters 193 x 244 kilometre orbit at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 Aug 7 Progress M1-3 in 272 x 297 kilometre transfer orbit
2000 Aug 8 20:13 Progress M1-3 docks with rear port of the Zvezda module while the International Space Station passes above northern Kazakhstan - orbit is 349 x 365 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 Aug 10 Fuel is transferred to the Zvezda module of the ISS from the Progress M1-3 cargo vessel
2000 Aug 11 A start is made on transferring oxidiser to Zvezda from Progress M1-3 but is halted automatically when a sensor detects an anomaly
2000 Aug 14 03:20 Space Shuttle Atlantis begins roll-out to Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Aug 14 13:30 Space Shuttle Atlantis installed on Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Aug 15 Progress M1-3 performs a test firing of its thrusters, resulting in the orbit of the ISS being raised from 348 x 363 kilometeres to 350 x 363 kilometres
2000 Aug 17 Orbit is 350 x 363 kilometres - two firings of Progrss-M1 3 engine are used to raise the ISS orbit to 357 x 370 kilometres
2000 Aug 31 NASA reports that transfer of fuel and oxidiser (260 kilogrammes total) from Progress M1-3 to both pairs of tanks within the Zvezda module of the ISS has been completed
2000 Sep 8 12:45 Space Shuttle Atlantis launched from Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-106 into an orbit of 280 x 331 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination - crew consists of Col Terrence Wilcutt, USMC (commander), Cdr Scott D Altman, USN (pilot), and mission specialists Dr Edward Tsang Lu, Richard A Mastracchio, Lt-Cdr Daniel C Burbank, USCG, Col Yuri Malenchenko, Russian Air Force, and Dr Boris I Morukov (Russia)
2000 Sep 10 05:51 Atlantis docks with the PMA-2 docking adaptor on the Unity Module of the International Space Station while passing over Khazakhstan and within range of Russian tracking stations - it is Atlantis second visit to the ISS - orbit is 352 x 366 kilometres
2000 Sep 11 Space Shuttle Discovery rolled-out to Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Sep 11 04:55 Lu and Malenchenko open Atlantis hatch to start a space walk in order to connect nine cables between Zarya and Zvezda (four cables to carry power from a future solar array to Zarya and Zvezda , two to carry video, two to allow Zvezda to control the positioning of Zarya solar arrays, and one optical fibre to carry future communications between US and Russian astronauts undertaking space walks), and to erect a magnetometer boom on the exterior of Zvezda which will used to gauge the station attitude in space
2000 Sep 11 11:01 Lu and Malenchenko seal Atlantis hatch at the end of the space walk
2000 Sep 11 12:30 Approx time - ISS orbit is 352 x 366 kilometres - Atlantis manoeuvring engines are fired thirty six times times over the period of one hour to raise the ISS orbit - after the firing, the orbit is 361 x 369 kilometres
2000 Sep 12 02:40 Wilcutt and Lu open the hatch to PMA-2 and enter the International Space Station - over the next few days they will remove restraints which held down equipment inside Zvezda during launch, unload supplies from Progress M1-3, and remove unwanted equipment from inside the station (including the docking probe from Progress M1-3) for return to Earth
2000 Sep 12 05:20 Wilcutt and Malenchenko open the hatch to Zvezda and report that the module is in excellent condition and that environmental conditions are good - during the course of the day they begin transferring cargo fro Atlantis to the Unity module
2000 Sep 12 06:22 The hatch to Progress M1-3 is opened
2000 Sep 12 15:00 NASA announces that Atlantis will be allowed to stay in orbit for an extra day to allow more time for preparation of the International Space Station to receive its first full crew visit late October
2000 Sep 13 The crew instals three batteries in Zvezda which were left out at launch to save weight, they also replace two batteries in Zarya , continuing work started by the previous visiting crew - work continues on unloading cargo into the ISS
2000 Sep 14 Unloading work from Atlantis includes two Russian Orlan-DMA spacesuits for use on future space walks - a toilet is unpacked from Progress M1-3
2000 Sep 14 06:13 For a second time, Atlantis manoeuvring engines are fired 36 times over the period of one hour to raise the ISS orbit - after the firing, the orbit is 369 x 372 kilometres
2000 Sep 15 06:46 For a third time, Atlantis manoeuvring engines are fired 36 times over the period of one hour to raise the ISS orbit - after the firing, the orbit is 373 x 380 kilometres
2000 Sep 16 Unloading activities include a treadmill - the crew also begins to replace equipment in PMA-2 which was removed by an earlier crew to make access to the station easier
2000 Sep 17 03:30 For a fourth and final time, Atlantis manoeuvring engines are fired 36 times over the period of one hour to raise the ISS orbit - after the firing, the orbit is 377 x 388 kilometres
2000 Sep 17 12:01 The hatch between Atlantis and the ISS is closed ready for the Shuttle departure
2000 Sep 18 03:46 While passing over the Ukraine, a spring mechanism pushes Atlantis away from the ISS to allow elements of the docking units to clear each other - Atlantis then uses its thrusters to move away and fly twice round the station to inspect and photograph it
2000 Sep 18 17:35 Atlantis fires its RCS and begins to move away from the ISS
2000 Sep 19 The crew of Atlantis spends the day testing the Shuttle control systems and preparing to return to Earth
2000 Sep 20 06:50 Atlantis fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2000 Sep 20 07:56 Atlantis lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
2000 Sep 20 07:58 Wheel stop - Atlantis mission is completed
2000 Sep 29 NASA Flight Readiness Review confirms 2000 Oct 5 as launch date for Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-92
2000 Oct 6 01:38 Originally planned launch time for Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station - lift off postponed due to concerns over the separation of the orbiter from the external tank following analysis of the Atlantis /STS-106 lift off - engineers are also concerned about a slow response from a pressure valve in Discovery fuel system
2000 Oct 7 01:16 Planned launch attempt for Space Shuttle Discovery - postponed 24 hrs before lift-off and prior to re-commencing the countdown due to continued concerns over one of Discovery fuel valves
2000 Oct 10 00:04 Second launch attempt for Space Shuttle Discovery - postponed due to high wind conditions at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Oct 10 23:40 Third launch attempt for Space Shuttle Discovery - postponed due to the presence of an equipment retaining pin lodged in the orbiter support structure and noticed by launch-pad inspection crews - mission managers are concerned about possible damage to the Orbiter should it fall during launch
2000 Oct 11 23:17 Space Shuttle Discovery launched from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-92 into orbit of 160 x 321 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Col Brian Duffy, USAF (commander), Lt-Col Pamela Ann Melroy, USN (pilot), and mission specialists Koichi Wakata (Japan National Space Development Agency), Leroy Chiao, Peter J K Wisoff, Cdr Michael E Lopez-Alegria, USN, and Col William Surles McArthur Jnr, USA
2000 Oct 12 mission controllers note that Discovery Ku-band antenna has failed, preventing communication via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) - this will limit the transmission of television pictures and high-speed data - the mission itself will be unaffected
2000 Oct 13 Duffy and McArthur use the Remote Manipulator System to conduct a camera survey of the exterior of the ISS
2000 Oct 13 17:45 Discovery docks with the PMA-2 docking adaptor on the Unity Module of the International Space Station while passing over the Ukraine and within range of Russian tracking stations - orbit is 375 x 382 kilometres
2000 Oct 13 20:30 Approximate time - Lopez-Alegria opens Discovery docking hatch
2000 Oct 13 21:15 Approximate time - Lopez-Alegria opens the hatch to PMA-2 and Duffy enters the Unity module of the International Space Station, followed by Lopez-Alegria, Chiao and Melroy - they begin to offload supplies for the first resident crew of the station due to arrive 2000 November
2000 Oct 14 Melroy and Wisoff open a hatch inside Unity which leads to the Z-1 truss pressurised compartment and link-up electrical earth (ground) connections between the Truss and Unity
2000 Oct 14 16:50 Approximate time - Wakata and Lopez-Alegria use the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to lift the Z-1 Truss out of the cargo bay - the operation begins about 2 hours and 15 minutes late due to an electrical short-circuit aboard Discovery and the need to re-route electrical power to several of Discover systems
2000 Oct 14 18:20 The Z-1 Truss is latched in place on Unity upper surface
2000 Oct 14 22:57 The outer hatch between Discovery and Unity is closed - the cabin pressure inside Discovery is then reduced in preparation for a space walk to take place 2000 October 15
2000 Oct 15 14:27 McArthur and Chiao begin a space walk to connect two sets of power cables (a group of six and a group of four) to provide power to heaters and conduits on the Z-1 Truss - the two astronauts also relocate two communication antenna assemblies and install a toolbox on the outside of the Truss - they are assisted by Wakata, who operates the RMS to move them around the shuttle payload bay and outside the ISS
2000 Oct 15 20:55 McArthur and Chiao seal Discovery hatch at the end of the space walk.
2000 Oct 16 14:15 Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria begin a space walk to oversee installation of PMA-3 on the lower face of Unity , they also prepare the Z-1 truss for fitting of solar panels during the next Shuttle visit - they release PMA-3 from it stowage pallet and guide Wakata as he manoeuvres it into position- Melroy then operates the remote control system to tighten the securing bolts - finally, Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria connect cables between the Adaptor and Unity
2000 Oct 16 21:04 Approximate time - Discovery manoeuvring engines are fired eighteen times, for 1.4 seconds each occasion, over a period of thirty minutes in order to raise the ISS orbit to 380 x 381 kilometres
2000 Oct 16 21:22 Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria seal Discovery hatch at the end of the space walk
2000 Oct 17 14:30 McArthur and Chiao begin a space walk to attach power convertors to the Z-1 Truss in preparation for it to have solar arrays attached, to complete the connection of cables between Unity and the Z-1 Truss and between Unity and PMA-3, and to re-route and reconfigure cables between PMA-2 and PMA-3 ready for the next Shuttle mission to use the new docking port - they are assisted by Lopez-Alegria and Wakata, who operate the RMS to move them around the outside of the ISS
2000 Oct 17 21:18 McArthur and Chiao seal Discovery hatch at the end of the space walk.
2000 Oct 17 21:30 Approximate time - for a second time, Discovery manoeuvring engines are fired eighteen times, for 1.4 seconds each occasion, over a period of thirty minutes in order to raise the ISS orbit to 381 x 386 kilometres
2000 Oct 18 15:00 Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria begin a space walk to remove a grapple fixture from the Z-1 Truss which was used when lifting it from Discovery cargo bay, complete preparations for the Z-1 Truss to receive a future solar panel, and test a gas-operated manoeuvring unit designed to allow an adrift astronaut to make it back to the space station - they cancelled a demonstration of recovering an incapacitated astronaut back into the Shuttle due to a lack of time
2000 Oct 18 21:53 Approximate time - for a third time, Discovery manoeuvring engines are fired eighteen times, for 1.4 seconds each occasion, over a period of thirty minutes in order to raise the ISS orbit to 381 x 391 kilometres
2000 Oct 18 21:56 Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria seal Discovery hatch at the end of the space walk
2000 Oct 20 15:08 Discovery undocks from the International Space Station
2000 Oct 20 15:53 Approximate time - Discovery fires its RCS and moves away from the International Space Station
2000 Oct 22 18:14 Originally-planned landing time for Discovery at the Kennedy Space Center, but the attempt (and a later one) are called off because crosswinds are too high
2000 Oct 23 Landing opportunities for Discovery at the Kennedy Space Center and at Edwards Air Force Base in California are waived due to continued winds and low cloud at KSC and rainfall at Edwards
2000 Oct 24 20:59 Discovery lands on the Edward Air Force Base Runway
2000 Oct 24 21:00 Wheel stop - Discovery mission is completed
2000 Oct 25 19:52 Discovery fires its OMS engines for three minutes to initiate re-entry
2000 Oct 31 07:52 Soyuz TM-31 spacecraft launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 1 by Soyuz-U rocket, carrying the ISS Expedition 1 crew consisting of Capt William M Shepherd, USN (Expedition 1 commander), Lt-Col Yuri Gidzenko, Russian Air Force (Soyuz commander) and Sergei Krikalyov (mission flight engineer)
2000 Oct 31 08:02 Soyuz TM-31 separates from its rocket and enters orbit of 185 x 231 kilometres at 51.7 degrees inclination
2000 Oct 31 12:00 Approximate time - Space Shuttle Endeavour begins roll-out to Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Oct 31 14:00 Soyuz TM-31 in 246 x 270 kilometre orbit
2000 Oct 31 22:00 Approximate time - Space Shuttle Endeavour installed on Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2000 Nov 1 04:02 Progress M1-3 undocks from the International Space Station to leave the Zvezda docking port clear for the arrival of Soyuz TM-31
2000 Nov 1 07:05 While passing near the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Progress M1-3 fires its manoeuvring engine to initiate re-entry
2000 Nov 1 07:40 Progress M1-3 enters the Earth atmosphere and burns up as a result of frictional heating while over the southern Pacific Ocean near Tahiti and the Cook Islands
2000 Nov 2 09:21 Soyuz TM-31 docks with the Zvezda module of the International Space Station - orbit is 379 x 388 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 Nov 2 10:23 The Expedition 1 crew opens the hatch between Soyuz TM-31 and Zvezda , and enters the International Space Station - initial operation will involve only the Zvezda and Zarya modules as Unity remains unpowered until the next shuttle mission which will install its solar arrays
2000 Nov 6 Expedition 1 crew instals components of the TORU manual control system for use in remote control of approaching Russian spacecraft (eg Progress)
2000 Nov 15 Expedition 1 crew tests operation of the TORU manual control system
2000 Nov 16 01:32 Progress M1-4 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 1 by Soyuz-U rocket
2000 Nov 16 01:42 Progress M1-4 separates from its rocket and enters an approximately 195 x 225 kilometre orbit at 51.6 degrees inclination
2000 Nov 16 07:16 Progress M1-4 in 260 x 270 kilometre transfer orbit
2000 Nov 18 03:06 Originally planned docking time for Progress M1-4 but a communications problem in the automatic docking system caused Progress M1-4 to halt when 100 metres from the docking port
2000 Nov 18 03:48 Progress M1-4 docks with Zarya lower forward docking port under manual control from the ISS , the crew has waited until the station enters the Earth shadow to avoid glare through the TV camera lens aboard Progress - orbit is 377 x 384 kilometres
2000 Dec 1 03:06 Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-97 into orbit of 197 x 323 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Cdr Brent Jett, USN (commander), Lt-Col Michael Bloomfield, USAF (pilot), and mission specialists Joseph Tanner, Lt-Col Carlos Noriega, USMC, and Marc Garneau (Canadian Space Agency)
2000 Dec 1 16:23 Progress M1-4 undocks from Zarya and moves away from the ISS into a 371 x 380 kilometre orbit from where it can return to he ISS if required after Endeavour departure
2000 Dec 2 The crew of Endeavour transfers a quantity of supplies (including coffee) and some replacement computer hardware to the PMA-3 Adaptor for the ISS crew (the two crews will not meet until all space walks are completed because of the need to maintain a lower air pressure inside Endeavour )
2000 Dec 2 19:59 Endeavour docks with the PMA-3 docking adaptor on the Unity Module of the International Space Station while passing over Kazakhstan - orbit is 374 x 380 kilometres
2000 Dec 2 20:17 Controlled by Marc Garneau, the Remote Manipulator System is used to lift the P6 Solar Array Truss out of its berth in Endeavour payload bay to begin several hours of acclimatisation to space
2000 Dec 3 09:38 Gidzenko and Krikalyov enter Unity and PMA-3 to collect the items left for them by the STS-97 crew
2000 Dec 3 18:35 Tanner and Noriega begin a space walk to attach the P6 Solar Array Truss to the Z1 Truss on Unity
2000 Dec 3 19:32 The P6 Solar Array Truss is latched in place on the Z-1 Truss after being lifted into position using the RMS, controlled by Marc Garneau aboard Discovery
2000 Dec 4 01:23 The crew aboard Endeavour unfurls the first panel of the ISS new solar array - the operation takes 13 minutes but mission managers are unhappy with the tension in the panel (possibly caused by a cable jumping off its pulley) and postpone deployment of the second array
2000 Dec 4 02:08 Tanner and Noriega complete their first space walk from Endeavour
2000 Dec 5 00:52 The crew of Endeavour unfurls the second panel of the ISS new solar array - the operation takes 114 minutes through use of a more-cautious, stop-start, approach than with the first panel
2000 Dec 5 10:30 The Expedition 1 crew begins internal work in the Unity module of the ISS to allow power from the new solar panels to be used
2000 Dec 5 17:21 Tanner and Noriega begin a space walk to connect cables and cooling lines from the new solar array structure, check out why the starboard panel is not properly tensioned, move an S-band antenna from the Z-1 Truss to the P-6 Tower, and prepare the PMA-2 docking adaptor to be moved during the next Shuttle mission that will deliver the Destiny laboratory module
2000 Dec 5 23:58 Tanner and Noriega complete their second space walk from Endeavour
2000 Dec 7 16:13 Tanner and Noriga begin a space walk to tension the starboard panel of the solar array and instal a probe to measure electrical potential in the new structure
2000 Dec 7 21:23 Tanner and Noriega complete their third space walk from Endeavour
2000 Dec 8 14:36 The hatch between Endeavour and the PMA-3 docking adaptor is opened and the STS-97 crew joins the Expedition 1 crew aboard the ISS
2000 Dec 9 15:51 The hatch between Endeavour and the PMA-3 docking adaptor is closed and the STS-97 crew prepares to undock from the ISS - orbit is 368 x 378 kilometres
2000 Dec 9 19:13 Endeavour undocks from the International Space Station
2000 Dec 11 21:57 Endeavour fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2000 Dec 11 23:03 Endeavour lands on the Kennedy Space Center runway
2000 Dec 11 23:04 Wheel stop - Endeavour mission is completed
2000 Dec 20 15:00 Approximate time - by virtue of its lower orbit, Progress M1-4 has reached a point about 2300 kilometres ahead of the ISS - firings of its manoeuvring engine raise the orbit from 367 x 384 kilometres to 372 x 382 kilometres which begins to reduce the separation distance between the two craft
2000 Dec 23 21:42 ISS passes Progress M1-4 at about 5 kilometres distance and the freighter begins to fall behind the space station in order to set up the right conditions for an approach prior to re-docking
2000 Dec 26 05:30 Approximate time - Progress M1-4 adjusts its orbit slightly and keeps station about 180 kilometres behind the ISS
2000 Dec 26 08:33 Progress M1-4 aligns itself for the approach and begins then begins to move towards the ISS
2000 Dec 26 10:54 Following an automatic approach followed by a period of manual control by Gidzenko using the TORU control system, Progress M1-4 re-docks with Zarya lower docking port - orbit is 364 x 375 kilometres
2001 Jan 2 13:30 Approximate time - Space Shuttle Atlantis begins roll-out at the Kennedy Space Center - unfortunately a computer problem with the transporter system means that it has to be rolled back into the Vehicle Assembly Building
2001 Jan 3 13:21 Space Shuttle Atlantis begins its second roll-out to Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Jan 3 20:45 Approximate time - Space Shuttle Atlantis installed on Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Jan 16 Inspections are needed of the wiring systems of all Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters - Atlantis originally planned launch on 2000 January 19 is postponed
2001 Jan 19 13:18 Space Shuttle Atlantis begins its roll-back to the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Jan 19 19:25 Space Shuttle Atlantis completes its roll-back the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Jan 26 06:30 Approximate time - Progress M1-5 raises its orbit to 256 x 281 kilometres
2001 Jan 26 11:48 Space Shuttle Atlantis begins its third roll-out to Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Jan 29 02:58 According to mission Control, any surviving pieces of Progress M-43 land in the sea at this time
2001 Feb 7 23:13 After a two minute delay due to troubleshooting an electronic component, Space Shuttle Atlantis launched from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-98 into orbit of 205 x 322 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Kenneth D Cockrell (commander), Mark Polansky (pilot), and mission specialists Cdr Robert L Curbeam (USN), Thomas D Jones and Marsha S Ivins
2001 Feb 8 11:26 Progress M1-4 undocks from Zarya and moves away from the ISS
2001 Feb 8 14:00 Atlantis in 306 x 361 kilometre orbit
2001 Feb 8 18:30 Estimated time - Following a retro rocket firing, Progress M1-4 re-enters the Earth atmosphere to the east of New Zealand and burns up as a result of frictional heating
2001 Feb 9 16:51 Atlantis docks with the PMA-3 docking adaptor on the Unity Module of the International Space Station while passing over the Pacific Ocean near New Guinea - orbit is 350x 363 kilometres
2001 Feb 9 19:03 The hatches between Atlantis and the ISS are opened so that the joint crews can unload supplies and technical hardware from the Shuttle to the Station
2001 Feb 10 01:00 Approximate time - the Shuttle crew leaves the ISS and the hatches are closed in order that the Orbiter cabin pressure can be lowered from 750 to 500 mm ready for the some of the Shuttle crew to undertake space walks
2001 Feb 10 11:48 A minor adjustment, adding approximately 1 kilometre to the orbital altitude, ensures that the ISS will avoid the possibility of colliding with a piece of space debris which has been detected on a path which might bring it close to the Station
2001 Feb 10 15:00 Using the Remote Manipulator System, Ivins removes the PMA-2 docking adaptor from Unity and stows it on a temporary fixture attached to the station Z-1 Truss
2001 Feb 10 15:50 Jones and Curbeam begin a space walk from Atlantis to supervise attachment of the Destiny module to the forward end of Unity - Ivins uses the Shuttle RMS to move the module into place then Jones and Curbeam connect power and data cables and coolant lines
2001 Feb 10 23:24 Jones and Curbeam complete their space walk from Atlantis one hour later than planned owing to de-contamination procedures needed when Curbeam space suit was exposed to frozen Ammonia leaking from a coolant line
2001 Feb 11 01:50 Approximate time - the hatches between Atlantis and the Space Station are opened so that Shuttle commander Cockrell and Station commander Shepherd can begin a remote control power-up of Destiny systems - at this point the hatches between Unity and Destiny are still closed
2001 Feb 11 ISS orbit is 350 x 363 kilometres - a series of thruster firings by Atlantis raises the orbit to 356 x 370 kilometres
2001 Feb 11 13:43 PMA-3 is locked onto Unity after being moved by Thomas using Discovery Remote Manipulator System (RMS) from the lower side of Unity to the left hand side (when facing forward)
2001 Feb 11 14:38 Joint crew of STS-98 and the ISS enters Destiny for the first time to begin work on activating internal equipment and installing a rack of equipment to augment the Station existing air purification system
2001 Feb 12 12:10 Space Shuttle Discovery begins roll-out to Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Feb 12 15:59 Jones and Curbeam begin a second space walk from Atlantis to supervise attachment of the PMA-2 docking adaptor to the forward end of the Destiny module (Ivins uses the RMS to move the adaptor from its temporary location on the Z-1 Truss) and to install the mounting unit for the ISS manipulator arm to be delivered on the STS-100 mission
2001 Feb 12 18:35 Space Shuttle Discovery installed on Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Feb 12 22:49 Jones and Curbeam complete their second space walk from Atlantis having finished their scheduled tasks ahead of time, as a result of the time gained. They bring forward the installation of shutters over the Window in Destiny together with an electric motor to operate them
2001 Feb 13 15:38 During two further sessions of pulsed firing of Atlantis thrusters spread over a total of 260 minutes elapsed time, the orbit of the ISS is raised further to 365 x 378 kilometres
2001 Feb 14 14:48 Jones and Curbeam begin a third space walk from Atlantis to attach a spare antenna to the Z-1 Truss, check and complete the earlier connections made between Unity and Destiny , and practice a technique for getting an injured astronaut back inside the Shuttle
2001 Feb 14 20:13 Jones and Curbeam complete their third space walk from Atlantis
2001 Feb 15 The joint crews of Atlantis and the ISS spend the day moving nearly 1,400 kilogrammes of equipment into the space station and removing about 400 kilogrammes of accumulated rubbish
2001 Feb 15 During a fourth, and final, session of pulsed firing of Atlantis thrusters, the orbit of the ISS is raised further to 376 x 389 kilometres
2001 Feb 16 13:14 The hatch between Atlantis and the PMA-3 docking adaptor is closed and the STS-98 crew prepares to undock from the ISS
2001 Feb 16 14:06 Atlantis undocks from the International Space Station and conducts a fly-around inspection before moving away
2001 Feb 18 17:53 Planned landing time for Atlantis - the Shuttle is waved-off on this and the next orbit due to high crosswinds on the Kennedy Space Center runway
2001 Feb 19 18:27 Possible landing time for Atlantis but, for a second day, the Shuttle is waved-off on this and the next orbit due to unfavourable weather at the Kennedy Space Center
2001 Feb 19 21:37 The core module of the Mir space station celebrates its fifteenth anniversary in orbit
2001 Feb 20 19:27 After controllers decide that the weather is still unfavourable at the Kennedy Space Centre, Atlantis fires its OMS engines for 163 seconds to initiate re-entry
2001 Feb 20 20:33 Atlantis lands on the Edwards Air Force Base concrete runway
2001 Feb 20 20:34 Wheel stop - Atlantis mission is completed
2001 Feb 24 10:06 Soyuz TM-31 undocks from the aft port of Zvezda with the Shepherd, Gidzenko and Krikalyov aboard
2001 Feb 24 10:35 Soyuz TM-31 docks with the downward-facing port on Zarya - the Zvezda docking port is now ready for use by Progress M-4
2001 Feb 26 08:09 Progress M-4 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 1 by Soyuz-U rocket
2001 Feb 26 08:19 Progress M-4 separates from its rocket and enters a 191 x 223 kilometre orbit at 51.6 degrees inclination
2001 Feb 26 19:00 Progress M-4 is in an orbit of 265 x 282 kilometres
2001 Feb 28 09:49 Progress M-4 docks with the rear port of Zvezda - orbit is 373 x 385 kilometres
2001 Mar 8 11:42 Space Shuttle Discovery launched from Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-102 into orbit of 159 x 235 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Capt James D Wetherbee, USN (commander), Lt-Col James M Kelly, USAF (pilot), and mission specialists Andy Thomas and Paul Richards - as passengers, Discovery carries the ISS Expedition 2 crew consisting of Yuri Usachev (station commander), Col James S Voss, USA (ret'd) and Col Susan Helms, USAF
2001 Mar 8 16:00 Discovery orbit is 233 x 273 kilometres
2001 Mar 10 05:34 Originally planned time for docking of Discovery with the ISS - it is delayed by difficulty with one of the main solar panels which were turned edge-on to Discovery on its approach to minimise contamination from exhaust plumes - it will not latch in place as planned so the panel is rotated slightly in order that an alternative latch can be used
2001 Mar 10 06:38 Discovery docks with PMA-2 on the forward-facing end of the Destiny module while over the southern Pacific Ocean near New Zealand - orbit is 371 x 381 kilometres
2001 Mar 11 Yuri Usachev contoured seat is fitted inside Soyuz TM-31 and he exchanges places aboard the ISS with yuri Gidzenko - he begins the handover routines with Bill Shepherd as relieving commander
2001 Mar 11 05:12 Helms and Voss begin a space walk to prepare for removing PMA-3 in order that the Leonardo module may be attached to Destiny - they also move a cradle assembly from Discovery cargo bay to the outside of Destiny which will be used later to mount the Station own RMS, and fit a cable tray to the outside of Destiny - they spend the last hour of the spacewalk waiting inside the airlock while the PMA-3 adaptor is moved
2001 Mar 11 14:08 Helms and Voss complete their space walk after 8 hrs 56 minutes - the longest space walk in Shuttle history
2001 Mar 12 03:37 Thomas attaches the RMS to Italian built Leonardo logistics module in Discovery cargo bay
2001 Mar 12 04:10 Using the RMS, Thomas lifts Leonardo from Discovery cargo bay
2001 Mar 12 06:02 Leonardo is firmly connected to Unity downward-facing Common Berthing Mechanism
2001 Mar 12 James Voss contoured seat is fitted inside Soyuz TM-31 and he exchanges places aboard the ISS with Sergei Krikalyov
2001 Mar 13 The ISS crew begins moving the five tonnes of equipment racks from inside Leonardo for re-fitting into the Destiny laboratory module
2001 Mar 13 05:23 Richards and Thomas start a space walk to add various items of equipment to the outside of the ISS including power cables for the upcoming RMS - they also move to the top of the tower on the Z-1 Truss in order to activate a latch on one of the solar panels
2001 Mar 13 11:44 Richards and Thomas complete their space walk after 6 hrs 21 mins - they then remain inside the airlock while it is depressurised for a short period as part of a Shuttle systems test
2001 Mar 14 06:00 Susan Helms' contoured seat is fitted inside Soyuz TM-31 and she exchanges places with Bill Shepherd - the crew exchange is complete but Shepherd remains commander of the ISS for the time being
2001 Mar 15 Discovery manoeuvring engines are fired repeatedly over a period of fifty minutes in order to raise the ISS orbit to 372 x 389 kilometres - this re-boost is 24 hours earlier than planned due to a need to move the ISS away from the orbit taken up by a 5 kg foot restraint which floated out of the cargo bay during the space walk 2000 March 11
2001 Mar 18 Compitations show that, through atmospheric drag, Mir's orbit will have reached a low-enough altitude for de-orbiting 2001 Mar 23
2001 Mar 18 10:40 Using the RMS, Thomas detaches Leonardo from Unity - the event has been delayed four hours due to the crew having to check for air leaks around Unity hatch
2001 Mar 18 12:08 Leonardo is locked down in Discovery cargo bay
2001 Mar 19 02:32 The hatches between Discovery and the ISS are closed - Yuri Usachev, Expedition 2 commander is now in charge of the ISS
2001 Mar 19 04:32 Discovery undocks from the International Space Station and conducts a fly-around inspection before moving away - Yuri Usachev, Expedition 2 commander is now in charge of the ISS
2001 Mar 21 06:26 Discovery fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2001 Mar 21 07:31 Discovery lands on the Edward Air Force Base Runway
2001 Mar 21 07:32 Wheel stop - Discovery mission is over and the ISS crew exchange between Expedition 1 and Expedition 2 has been completed
2001 Mar 23 06:04 Fragments of Mir - possibly as much as 25 tonnes of debris - impact in the southern Pacific Ocean
2001 Apr 4 The thrusters of Progress M-4 are fired briefly under control of Zvezda computers as a test
2001 Apr 10 16:05 Atlantis docks with the PMA-2 Adaptor at the forward-facing end of Destiny - orbit is 384 x 388 kilometres
2001 Apr 10 18:07 The hatches between Atlantis and the International Space Station are opened
2001 Apr 16 08:48 Progress M1-4 undocks from Zarya and moves away from the ISS
2001 Apr 16 13:23 Progress M1-4 fires its rocket engine, re-enters the Earth atmosphere and burns up as a result of frictional heating
2001 Apr 18 12:40 Soyuz TM-31 undocks from the downward-facing port of Zvezda with the Shepherd, Gidzenko and Krikalyov aboard
2001 Apr 18 13:01 Soyuz TM-31 docks with the aft port on Zarya - this leaves clearance for the upcoming STS-100 crew to dock the Rafaello logistics module
2001 Apr 19 18:40 Space Shuttle Endeavour launched from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on mission STS-100 into orbit of 200 x 317 kilometres at 51.6 degrees inclination with crew consisting of Capt Kent V Rominger, USN (commander), Capt Jeffrey S Ashby, USN (pilot), and mission specialists Col Chris Hadfield, Canadian Air Force, Dr John L Phillips, Dr Scott Parazynski, Dr Umbert Guidoni, ESA, and Lt-Col Yuri V Lonchakov, Russian Air Force - as passengers
2001 Apr 21 01:59 Endeavour docks with PMA-2 on the forward-facing end of the Destiny module - orbit is 371 x 381 kilometres
2001 Apr 22 11:45 Parazynski and Hadfield start a space walk to install a new UHF antenna on the outside of Destiny and to begin the transfer of the Canadarm-2 robotic arm from Endeavour to the ISS - after the arm is extended from its mounting point on Endeavour and clamped to a cradle on the outside of Destiny , they connect power and control cables to the ISS end of the arm
2001 Apr 22 18:53 On board the ISS , Voss and Helms conduct the first test of the Station new robotic arm by moving it slightly under remote control
2001 Apr 22 18:55 Parazynski and Hadfield complete their space walk after 7 hrs 10 min
2001 Apr 23 ISS orbit is 374 x 391 kilometres - a series of thruster firings by Endeavour over a one hour period raises it to 377 x 395 kilometres
2001 Apr 23 09:25 The hatches between Endeavour and Unity are opened and the visiting and residential crews meet for the first time
2001 Apr 23 11:13 One end of Canadarm-2 is moved from it pallet aboard Endeavour
2001 Apr 23 14:16 The free end of Canadarm-2 is attached to a power and data hookup point on Unity
2001 Apr 23 14:58 Using the Shuttle RMS, Parazynski lifts Rafaello from Discovery cargo bay
2001 Apr 23 16:00 Rafaello logistics module is firmly connected to Destiny downward-facing Common Berthing Mechanism, having been lifted out of Endeavour cargo by by the Shuttle robot arm
2001 Apr 23 19:26 The hatches between Endeavour and Unity are closed to allow the internal pressure of the Orbiter to be lowered in preparation for a second space walk
2001 Apr 24 The crew of the ISS starts moving equipment from Rafaello into Destiny
2001 Apr 24 12:34 Parazynski and Hadfield start a space walk to complete electrical connections on the Canadarm-2, remove an aerial from the Early Communications System and move some other equipment - during the operation a cover from an electrical box is lost when it drifts away from Hadfield and lodges on the outside of the station (subsequently retrieved 2001 Dec 10 during the STS-108 mission )
2001 Apr 24 mission planners decide that a third scheduled space walk on April 26 will not be needed
2001 Apr 24 After he crew has retired for the night, mission Control detects that one of the ISS command and control computers has gone offline
2001 Apr 24 20:15 Parazynski and Hadfield complete their space walk after 7 hrs 40 min
2001 Apr 24 22:15 Endeavour crew returns to the ISS
2001 Apr 25 The ISS crew and mission Control work on the computer problem - planned work with the new robot arm is postponed until April 26
2001 Apr 26 mission planners decide to extend Endeavour docked time with the ISS by two days to 30 April - Russia refuses a corresponding delay in the upcoming Soyuz TM-32 launch - NASA aims for a departure on April 29 but Russia agrees that the Soyuz TM-32 docking can be delayed if necessary
2001 Apr 26 07:00 Soyuz TM-32 and its launching rocket are transferred from the assembly building to the launch pad
2001 Apr 26 08:45 The ISS command and control computer is back on line
2001 Apr 27 19:30 A second series of thruster firings by Endeavour results in an orbit of 381 x 404 kilometres - the firing was over a longer period than originally planned due to postponement of thruster firings on Apr 25 following the computer problem
2001 Apr 27 20:03 Using the Shuttle RMS, Rafaello is detached from Unity
2001 Apr 27 20:59 Rafaello is locked down in Endeavour cargo bay
2001 Apr 28 07:37 Soyuz TM-32 spacecraft launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome by Soyuz-U rocket, carrying a Soyuz 'Taxi' crew consisting of Talbat Musabeyev (commander), Yuri Baturin (Flight Engineer), and Dennis Tito (private US citizen) into an orbit of 182 x 231 kilometers at 51.6 degrees inclination
2001 Apr 28 14:30 Soyuz TM-32 orbit is 254 x 326 kilometres
2001 Apr 28 20:44 The ISS Canadarm-2 is used in a joint test with the Canadarm installed on Endeavour - Endeavour arm lifts a Spacelab pallet out of the cargo bay and passes it to the arm on the space station
2001 Apr 28 21:02 The ISS arm passes the Spacelab pallet back to Endeavour arm which then re-berths it in the cargo bay
2001 Apr 29 14:41 Hatches between the ISS and Endeavour are closed for the last time on mission STS-100
2001 Apr 29 17:34 Endeavour undocks from the International Space Station and conducts a fly-around inspection and films the Station using an IMAX camera
2001 Apr 29 18:28 A short firing of Endeavour thrusters causes it to move away from the ISS
2001 Apr 30 07:58 Soyuz TM-32 docks with the downward-facing docking port on Zarya - orbit is 381 x 403 kilometres
2001 Apr 30 The Soyuz TM-32 crew switches the contoured couches between their vehicle and Soyuz TM-31 - Soyuz TM-32 is now the Station operational emergency return vehicle
2001 May 1 Two landing opportunities for Endeavour at the Kennedy Space Center are waved off due to weather, controllers decide to land at Edwards Air Force Base in California
2001 May 1 15:02 Endeavour fires its OMS engines to initiate re-entry
2001 May 1 16:10 Endeavour lands on the Edward Air Force Base Runway
2001 May 1 16:11 Wheel stop - Endeavour mission is over
2001 May 6 02:21 Soyuz TM-31 undocks from the ISS with Musabeyev, Baturin and Tito aboard - ISS orbit is 379 x 402 kilometres
2001 May 6 04:47 Soyuz TM-31 fires its retro rockets to initiate re-entry
2001 May 6 05:41 Soyuz TM-31 lands in an area north-north-east of Arkalyk in Kazakhstan
2001 May 9 Endeavour begins a flight from Edwards Air Force Base to the Kennedy Space Centre attached to NASA Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA)
2001 May 10 The ISS crew starts its first weekly check of the operation of Canadarm-2
2001 May 20 21:32 Progress M1-6 cargo supply ship launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome Launch Complex 1 by Soyuz-FG rocket into orbit of 188 x 218 kilometres - it carries 1.3 tonnes of cargo and 1.2 tonnes of propellant (900 kg of which is for replenishing Zvezda tanks)
2001 May 21 06:30 Progress M1-6 orbit is 270 x 317 kilometers
2001 May 23 00:23 Under the control of mission Control Centre - Moscow, Progress M1-6 docks with the rear-facing port of Zvezda , recently cleared by the departure of Soyuz TM-31 - ISS orbit is 374 x 398 kilometres
2001 May 30 NASA announces that the next Shuttle mission (STS-104) has been potponed from June 14 to July 7 in order to allow trouble-shooting on Canadarm-2 to be completed
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